Wednesday, October 1, 2008

Today I am grateful for...


The rain that is coming. I feel it in my joints already and I am so thankful it is coming. Do you know what this means?! It means that I can close my eyes and listen to the tiny drops as they hit the ground. I can smell the long dried earth as it gets a drink for the first time in a long time. I can jump into mud puddles, wiggle my toes. After playing in the rain go inside and get warm with a cup of hot cocoa and a book while snuggling under my snuggliest blankie. Ahhh!!!Life will be good!

4 comments:

Jan said...

Love the look in here. Spooky. Have a cozy night under the rain.

Redhoodoos said...

Cute blog background!! Really cute.

I love rain too. It's coming for us this weekend. Nothing like the smells and the sounds.

Dasha said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Dasha said...

specimens readily definable as snakes with lizardlike skeletal structures have been uncovered in South America and Africa.[2] It has been agreed, on the basis of morphology, that snakes descended from lizards.[3][2] Fossil evidence suggests that snakes may have evolved from burrowing lizards, such as varanids or a similar group during the Cretaceous Period.[4] An early fossil snake, Najash rionegrina, was a two-legged burrowing animal with a sacrum, and was fully terrestrial.[5] One extant analog of these putative ancestors is the earless monitor Lanthanotus of Borneo, although it also is semi-aquatic.[6] As these ancestors became more subterranean, they lost their limbs and their bodies became more streamlined for burrowing.[6] According to this hypothesis, features such as the transparent, fused eyelids (brille) and loss of external ears evolved to combat subterranean conditions such as scratched corneas and dirt in the ears with snakes re-emerged onto the surface of the earth much as they are today.[6][4] Other primitive snakes are known to have possessed hindlimbs but lacked a direct connection of the pelvic bones to the vertebrae, including Haasiophis, Pachyrhachis and Eupodophis, which are slightly older than Najash.[7]